Archive for 2014

In The News

Human Rights Protection in Modern Cambodia: Building on Unstable Grounds

April 23, 2014

On January 3, ongoing street protests by garment workers in Cambodia’s capital, Phnom Penh, turned violent when government troops opened fire into a crowd of civilians, killing four and leaving one person missing. A total of 23 civilians were arrested and 21 are still detained without bail. Nearly four months later, there still have been no known official inquiries into the handling of the events by the security forces. Twenty years after the signing of the Paris Peace Accords, which formally ended Cambodia’s war and aimed to promote and encourage respect for and observance of human rights in Cambodia…

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In The News

Obama’s Asia Trip to Test Rebalancing Policy

April 23, 2014

This week President Obama travels to four Asian countries – Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, and Malaysia. In many respects, the president’s visit is to make up for his absence last October in Brunei and Indonesia to attend the East Asia Summit (EAS) and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders meeting because of the U.S. government shutdown.

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Notes from the Field

Access to Justice Constraints Fuel Conflict in Southern Thailand

April 23, 2014

Access to justice, security, and human rights protection rank among the core issues that fuel the protracted subnational conflict in southern Thailand and are central to the prospect of its future resolution. For the last decade, the southern border provinces of Yala, Narathiwat, and Pattani have faced a resurgence of an indigenous…

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Notes from the Field

A New Face of Policing in Timor-Leste

April 23, 2014

On March 27, the national police of Timor-Leste (PNTL) celebrated their 14th anniversary with full pomp and circumstance. For 24 years until 1999, the police in Timor were under the command of the Indonesia military. Now, it seems that memories of countrywide conflict and instability in this small tropical nation are receding.

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Notes from the Field

Philippines Mobilizes for a Disability-Inclusive 2016 Presidential Election

April 23, 2014

In his 4th State of the Nation Address in June 2013, Philippine President Aquino praised a 30-year-old Makati resident Nino Aguirre who has no legs, but had laboriously climbed four floors to reach his polling station and cast his vote in the May 2013 midterm elections. While Mr. Aguirre’s feat demonstrated laudable…

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Notes from the Field

A Conversation with Mongolian NGO Leader Badruun Gardi

April 23, 2014

Just back from an intensive, nine-day leadership training workshop in Singapore and the Philippines, which kicked off The Asia Foundation’s Development Fellows program, In Asia editor Alma Freeman interviewed one of the 10 Badruuninaugural Fellows from Mongolia, Badruun Gardi…

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Notes from the Field

Photo Blog: Critical Issue – Access to Justice & Human Rights

April 23, 2014

Weak legal institutions and poorly functioning systems of justice pose challenges to citizens throughout Asia in resolving disputes, enforcing their rights, and accessing benefits to which they are legally entitled. This photo blog examines issues of access to justice and human rights through the lens of three countries

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Featured

Public Awareness Campaign Raises Awareness of Solid Waste Management in Mongolia

April 23, 2014

Solid waste management is a key challenge in Mongolia’s sprawling capital, Ulaanbaatar, particularly in the surrounding ger districts where half of the city’s 1.2 million residents still live without access to even basic public services, an issue that has led to many illegal and unhealthy dump sites. To mark Ulaanbaatar’s city-wide cleanup on April 19, […]

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In The News

Impartiality Critical to Ensuring Afghanistan’s Election Credibility

April 16, 2014

Election day in Afghanistan exceeded even the most optimistic expectations, with long queues of men and women turning out to vote for a new president in what many are declaring a sign of increased political maturity and belief in democratic systems among Afghans today. Estimates show a turnout of over 50 percent – 37 percent of whom were women – all the more significant in an environment where fear of violence was on high in the lead-up to the election and threatened to impact voter turnout. Instead, Afghans defied threats and attacks by insurgent groups and came out in large numbers to cast their vote. On Sunday, Afghans heard the first official report of partial results, with two candidates, Abdullah Abdullah and Ashraf Ghani, appearing to take the lead with a run-off likely.

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Notes from the Field

Urban Ecology Reconnects Humans with Nature

April 16, 2014

Last month, China unveiled its grand urbanization plan to increase the number of people living in cities to 60 percent, or around 100 million additional people, by 2020. In fact, China’s migration plan reflects a global trend: right now, about half of the world’s population…

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