Posts By Erik Jensen

In The News

The Road Ahead for Afghanistan

April 8, 2015

On the eve of Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s March 22–25 visit to the United States, the Stanford University Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule Law, the United States Institute for Peace, and Chatham House convened a two-day conference in Washington on lessons learned for strengthening the state in Afghanistan. The conference brought together some fifty U.S., Afghan, and other international policy experts with extensive experience in state-building efforts in Afghanistan since 2002. The Asia Foundation’s Karl Eikenberry, former U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, who commanded the NATO coalition forces there, and Erik Jensen, director of Stanford’s Rule of Law Program, helped organize…

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Notes from the Field

New Texts Boost Timor-Leste’s Legal Capacity

October 30, 2013

Justin Bieber may not have visited Asia’s newest state, Timor-Leste, yet, but as six Stanford law students found out earlier this year, his popularity has preceded him at the National University of Timor-Leste (UNTL). The Stanford students were visiting UNTL with the Timor-Leste Legal Education Project (TLLEP), a partnership among The Asia Foundation…

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In The News

Rule of Law and Peace-Building: A Modest Proposal

June 25, 2010

In the larger debate about the relationship of development assistance to security, the gap between normative assertions and empirical evidence yawns. Since the 1990s, the concept of “rule of law” has been enthusiastically embraced by international development actors and touted as the key to consolidating peace in post-conflict societies. Rhetorical overuse of the term has […]

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Notes from the Field

Developing Rule of Law

October 29, 2008

From 1985 to 1989 I was a Senior Fulbright Scholar and a law consultant to The Asia Foundation’s office in Colombo, Sri Lanka.  During that time, I also taught in Sri Lanka’s law schools. Last December, I was back in Sri Lanka and learned that a book I wrote during my days there, An Introduction […]

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In The News

In Pakistan: “Necessity” is the Mother of Constitutional Continuity. Is it also the Mother of Judicial Tenure?

May 2, 2007

About a decade ago, following the installation of the last caretaker regime of the “democratic era” in Pakistan, I suggested to a prominent Pakistani politician that the doctrine of necessity was one of Pakistan’s core jurisprudential principles.  To this he replied, “yes, too much necessity and not enough doctrine.”  Indeed, the Supreme Court has thrice […]

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