Related Posts: Conflict and Fragile Conditions

In The News

Subnational Conflict: The Dark Underbelly of a Rising Asia

August 6, 2014

Asia’s rise has been momentous. Since the early 1960s, Asia has grown richer faster than any other region in the world. In 1990, 56 percent of people in East Asia and 54 percent in South Asia lived on under $1.25 a day (PPP). By 2010, these rates had fallen to 12 percent and 31 percent…

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Notes from the Field

Photo Blog: Critical Issue – Ethnic and Religious Conflict

August 6, 2014

Subnational conflicts are the most deadly, widespread, and enduring violent conflicts in Asia. Recent studies by The Asia Foundation indicate that more people have died in the region’s 26 subnational conflicts than in international conflicts during the past 20 years. In South and Southeast Asia, active conflicts affect regions that are roughly the size of Indonesia…

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Featured

Photographer Conor Ashleigh Chronicles Work in Conflict Areas

August 6, 2014

In this TED talk, Conor Ashleigh, award-winning photographer and visual storyteller, shares stories of chronicling long-running conflicts, climate change hot spots, and communities undergoing transition in places where inequality and poverty remain among the world’s highest. In September, The Asia Foundation will feature Conor’s work on assignment for The Asia Foundation at a special photo […]

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Notes from the Field

Watch: Asia Foundation Experts Discuss Elections in Post-Conflict States

July 23, 2014

On July 2, The Asia Foundation’s Country Representative for Nepal George Varughese and Country Representative in Cambodia Silas Everett spoke on a panel hosted by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) in London to discuss elections and development

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In The News

Media Campaign Ignites Push for Local Elections in Pakistan

July 9, 2014

There is much talk these days in Pakistan about democracy. Just over a year since national elections marked the first transition in the country’s history from one democratically elected federal government to another, some are already calling for new elections for reasons ranging from alleged malpractice at the 2013 polls…

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In The News

Reexamining Growth and Poverty in Myanmar

June 25, 2014

International data indicate that Myanmar’s current growth rate is about 7 percent, which by any measure should indicate progress and pride. Macroeconomic reforms have been extensive. The unrealistic legal exchange rate, which at one point was about 150 times…

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In The News

In First Runoff Election, Afghans to Vote for Reform

June 11, 2014

On April 5, 2014, Afghans turned out in the first round of elections to choose a successor to outgoing president, Hamid Karzai, in what was perhaps the most successful election Afghanistan has ever held. Despite a limited number of international forces and endemic intimidation by insurgents, 7 million Afghans – one-third of whom were women – stood in the rain in long queues before the polls had even opened to cast their votes. Aside from a few cases, Election Day was relatively peaceful, with officials reporting far fewer violent incidences than in 2009. The voters, covered with plastic sheets, the security institutions manned exclusively by Afghans…

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In The News

Najla Ayubi on Elections and Women in Afghanistan

June 11, 2014

If Afghanistan is synonymous with a rugged terrain and warring tribes, the “graveyard of empires,” then it should also be synonymous with courage and defiance. Afghan women collectively deserve not only the Nobel Prize for peace, but also a prize for courage and valor, especially crafted for them.

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Notes from the Field

Renowned Afghan Archaeologist Zemaryalai Tarzi Discusses Bamiyan

June 11, 2014

On February 26, leading Afghan archaeologist Zemaryalai Tarzi spoke at The Asia Foundation’s headquarters in San Francisco. Formerly the general director of Archaeology and Preservation of the Historical Monuments of Afghanistan, Professor Tarzi is currently president…

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In The News

Thailand in 2014: Reform or Repression?

May 28, 2014

After declaring martial law for just a couple of days, Thailand’s military decided to launch a full-blown military “takeover” which most people in the rest of the world called a coup. The junta is now called the National Peace and Order Maintaining Council (NPOMC).

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