Related Posts: International Development

Notes from the Field

Research Effectiveness: The Case of the Mindanao Conflict

December 18, 2013

Research is most useful for development practitioners when it is embedded in the entire endeavor, directing and directed by actions and reflections throughout implementation, rather than being something done initially to design a project and at the end to evaluate it.

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Notes from the Field

Making the Evidence Agenda in Development More Plausible

December 18, 2013

“What is the evidence?” This must be the most common question in development programming and policy these days. Donors are pressing practitioners to present evidence that their programming approaches are working – themselves under pressure to show measurable results and the evidence for those.

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In The News

In Afghanistan, Provincial-Level Institutions Critical to Protecting and Advancing Women’s Rights

December 11, 2013

Five months from now, Afghanistan will enter a critical juncture of transition and election, in a dynamic context where large parts of the country are now increasingly controlled by Taliban shadow governments.

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Notes from the Field

Getting Academics and Aid Workers to Work Together

December 11, 2013

Aid workers and academics would seem natural collaborators. Development studies courses are common and it is routine to find academics who oscillate between the academy and the field as aid workers. In turn, the aid world often calls upon academics to provide expert advice and looks to their literature for guidance.

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In The News

Afghans Apprehensive But Cautiously Optimistic as They Move into Critical Transition

December 4, 2013

Today in Kabul, The Asia Foundation released its annual Survey of the Afghan People, the country’s broadest and most comprehensive public opinion poll with 9,260 Afghans interviewed face-to-face across all 34 provinces of Afghanistan. This year’s survey is particularly significant as it reflects the perceptions of the Afghan people as they enter the critical transition year of 2014 faced with national elections, the drawdown of the remaining international security forces in the country, the growing insurgency, and the impact these events will have on the nation’s economy.

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In The News

Afghanistan’s Complex Women’s Rights Discourse

December 4, 2013

Are women’s rights and gender equality universal or culturally and geographically confined to the West? Are there certain cultures and political systems that are inherently misogynistic? Are the concerns of Western powers’ about women’s rights sincere or are they an instrument to pursue their own political objectives against their rivals?

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In The News

The Yolanda Tragedy: 7 Lessons in Early Emergency Response

November 20, 2013

Last month, when the 7.2 earthquake struck the Philippine provinces of Cebu and Bohol, I was in the southern city of Zamboanga facilitating dialogues between Muslim and Christian leaders to alleviate possible religious tension following the September siege that displaced thousands and threatened the good relationship of the city’s two faith communities. It was the furthest thing from my mind that an even more devastating disaster would happen just a month later, right in Tacloban City, where I had left my wife and kids in safety (or so I thought) and in the province of Eastern Samar where I grew up playing in the gentle edges of the mighty Pacific Ocean.

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In The News

Despite Double Disasters, Bohol’s Local Response Strong

November 20, 2013

Less than one month after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake destroyed areas of Bohol province in the Central Visayas region of the Philippines, Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan), said to be one of the most powerful storms ever to hit land…

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In The News

Devastation in the Philippines

November 13, 2013

On November 8, Typhoon Yolanda (known internationally as Haiyan) struck central Philippines, particularly the eastern coasts of the islands of Leyte and Samar, carrying winds close to 200 mph and causing a massive storm surge that flattened entire towns and devastated communities in its wake. Yolanda is said to be one of the most powerful storms ever to hit land. The official death toll stands at more than 2,300, but local officials warn that number could increase significantly. An estimated 8 million people have been affected and 600,000 are displaced. Most visible is the plight of residents of coastal Tacloban – Leyte’s capital city and regional economic hub – who are struggling to find the most basic of services: food, water, shelter, and electricity.

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In The News

Relocation a Boon for Bangladeshi Leather Sector

November 13, 2013

The government of Bangladesh and the two primary Bangladeshi leather industry trade associations reached a historical agreement last month to transfer the leather industry from central Dhaka to Savar, a new, environmentally compliant industrial zone on the outskirts of the city. According to the president of the Bangladesh Tanners Association, the new location could boost the industry’s export revenues from $1-5 billion. Economists predict that if the leather industry continues its impressive growth, it may even challenge the ready-made garment sector as one of Bangladesh’s most valuable exports.

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