Related Posts: Thai Elections

In The News

No Sign of Compromise in Thailand’s Deepening Political Crisis

May 14, 2014

A turbulent last 10 days in Thailand’s protracted political crisis has left its embattled political leaders no closer to a compromise solution. Emboldened by the Constitutional Court’s decision last week to remove former Pheu Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra…

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In The News

Fissures in Thailand: Both Natural and Man-Made

May 14, 2014

May 5 was the start of a very tumultuous week in Thailand on many fronts. But it initially did not start that way. May 5 is Coronation Day in Thailand, a national holiday, which this year commemorated the 64th anniversary of King Bhumipol Adulyadev’s ascension to the throne.

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In The News

Observing Thailand’s Tense Elections

February 5, 2014

Despite months of protests by anti-government demonstrators, and an election boycott by the main opposition party, the Democrat Party, Thailand held a national election on Sunday. The protesters, known as the People’s Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC), were demanding that the current government led…

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In The News

Credible Reform, Not Shutdown, Needed to End Thailand’s Political Standoff

January 15, 2014

For more than two months, tens of thousands of anti-government protesters have gathered at Democracy Monument and other major intersections throughout Bangkok. Initially, the People’s Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC), led by former long-time Democrat politician, Suthep Thaugsuban…

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In The News

The Bangkok Shutdown and Thailand’s Battle for Democracy

January 15, 2014

As anti-government protests shut down Thailand’s capital this week, In Asia editor Alma Freeman spoke with The Asia Foundation’s country representative in Thailand and Bangkok resident, Kim McQuay, about the situation on the ground.

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In The News

Thailand Political Standoff: The Latest Flash of Deep-Seated Tensions

December 11, 2013

This week, Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, sister of controversial former leader Thaksin Shinawatra, dissolved parliament in response to an escalating anti-government protest movement. Led by former Deputy Prime Minister Suthep Thaugsuban, the movement has mobilized tens of thousands of whistle-blowing demonstrators under the banner of the People’s Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC). PDRC has declared its intention to unseat the Pheu Thai government, remove the Shinawatra family from politics, and press for the appointment of an imprecisely defined “People’s Council” that would seemingly be composed of neutral, respected leaders who would replace elected government for an undefined period of time.

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Events

Asia Foundation’s Thailand Country Rep Speaks on Post-Election Environment

October 5, 2011

Nearly five months have passed since Thailand elected its first-ever woman prime minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, younger sister of the controversial former prime minister, Thaksin Shinawatra, who was ousted in a military coup in 2006.

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In The News

What Happens When Thaksin Returns to Thailand?

August 10, 2011

Last week, Thailand made history when its parliament elected its first-ever woman Prime Minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, one month after her Pheu Thai party swept the July 3 elections. However, Prime Minister Yingluck’s ability to rise to the top of Thailand’s political echelon is not because of her political acumen.

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In The News

Is Thailand’s Political Turmoil a Sign of Positive Societal Transformation?

July 13, 2011

Thailand’s political landscape throughout much of the 20th century was populated by numerous regional or personality-based parties, and characterized by weak coalition governments. Alliances and coalitions were made and broken easily, as parties sought the best deal for their constituents and members.

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In The News

Thailand’s Deep South: A Political Labyrinth

July 13, 2011

Contrary to the predictions made by the plethora of political pundits watching Thailand’s elections that the Democrats would have difficulty holding their five current seats in Thailand’s Deep South, the Democrats instead ran away with nine out of 11 constituent seats.

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