The Asia Foundation Appoints Todd Wassel Country Representative in Laos

San Francisco and Vientiane, February 26, 2019 — The Asia Foundation announces the appointment of Todd Wassel as country representative in Laos. Prior to this appointment, Wassel served as the Foundation’s country representative in Timor-Leste, where he managed programs that help build responsive state institutions to prevent crime and conflict through community-oriented policing and strengthening local governance at the community level.

Before joining the Foundation, Todd served as a Tourism Advisor with UNDP for an ethnically-mixed area in Southern Kosovo, and as an Area Based Development Program Coordinator under the United Nation’s Resident Coordinator’s Office, where he managed a six UN agency service delivery and conflict prevention program in the divided city of Mitrovica in Northern Kosovo.

Wassel also previously worked with USAID and the Centre on Housing Rights and Evictions in Sri Lanka. He has extensive experience working with both local and international NGOs in conflict and post conflict countries and helping governments develop inclusive decisions making structures for good public policy.

Wassel received a bachelor’s degree in Asian Studies and Comparative Religions from Colgate University, and a master’s degree in International Development and Conflict Resolution from the Fletcher School at Tufts University.

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The Asia Foundation Appoints Pauline Tweedie Country Representative for Timor-Leste

San Francisco and Dili, February 22, 2019 — The Asia Foundation announces the appointment of Pauline Tweedie as country representative in Timor-Leste. With over 20 years of experience working across Asia in the international development sector, Tweedie oversees a country team focused on good governance, reducing violence against women, promoting peace and justice and building an inclusive economy, and will continue to build on the Timor-Leste’s office strong regional and local partnerships.

Tweedie has been with the Foundation since 2003, most recently as a senior technical advisor with The Asia Foundation’s Program Specialist Group and a member of the Conflict and Fragility team. She also brings extensive quantitative and qualitative research experience having led numerous public perception research projects and overseeing a review of all Asia Foundation perception survey work to gather and document 300 surveys which resulted in the development of the Foundation’s data visualization portal.

Previously, Tweedie served as The Asia Foundation’s deputy country representative for Thailand from 2009 to 2016, where she was responsible for overseeing conflict mitigation programs in Thailand’s deep south. She has also worked for the Foundation in Cambodia, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Nepal. In addition to her work for The Asia Foundation, Tweedie has extensive international NGO experience, serving as research consultant for JICA and USAID, and as gender advisor for GIZ Afghanistan.

She received a bachelor’s degree in Finance and Economics from the University of Western Ontario, and a master’s degree in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

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The Asia Foundation Supports Nepal’s First Women in Data Conference

February 22, 2019 — On February 23, with support from Development Initiatives, The Asia Foundation’s Data for Development (D4D) program hosted Nepal’s inaugural Women in Data conference. The conference theme was “where two superpowers meet,” bringing together female speakers, data professionals, and aspiring young women to discuss the achievements of women in data, and how best to further advance female inclusion in this growing industry.

Hosted at the Hotel Himalaya in Kathmandu, the conference program featured a selection of panels and workshop sessions on topics ranging from gender statistics in Nepal, to women using data for social good.

The conference also included opportunities for networking and a data infomart. The keynote address was delivered by Meghan Nalbo, country representative for The Asia Foundation in Nepal, “We need more women in data! The beauty of data for me is that it tells a story. When a woman looks at data, a different story may come to light than when a man looks at data.”

This program of events was organized by The Asia Foundation and Development Initiatives as part of the D4D partnership. Supported by UK Aid, it is also delivered with assistance from a range of local partners. The D4D Program works to ensure that more and better data is available, accessible and usable by a range of government, civil society, and private sector actors to inform decision making, implementation and monitoring of development efforts at the national and local level. You can read more about our work under the D4D program here.

The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our work across the region addresses five overarching goals—strengthen governance, empower women, expand economic opportunity, increase environmental resilience, and promote regional cooperation.

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Asia Foundation Releases City Life Survey 2018 in Myanmar

February 22, 2019 — Urban residents report high trust and infrastructure improvements, but worry about safety and security.

According to a new survey released today by The Asia Foundation, urban residents in Myanmar’s cities report strong social cohesion and personal relationships. Trust is high, people are very charitable, and people say they are willing to make personal sacrifices to improve their communities. Urban residents see infrastructure improvements moving their city in the right direction, but worry about safety, security, and economic uncertainty. The first of its kind in Myanmar, the 2018 City Life Survey (2018 CLS) is a multi-year, multi-city public perception survey designed to provide policymakers with reliable and objective information about the experience and well-being of Myanmar’s urban residents.

The country’s democratic transition, however nascent, has galvanized policymakers in government to understand the needs of the people so that they can better respond to them. As cities grow, government officials must tackle increased congestion, growing demands on public services, rising pollution, ensure economic opportunities for the majority, and work to maintain social cohesion and safety.

Two over-arching findings from the 2018 CLS indicate that where you live and who you are affect your experiences and your sense of well-being. In September and October 2018, 2,400 respondents of Yangon, Mandalay, Taunggyi, Mawlamyine, and Monywa were asked 135 questions on their personal, economic, physical, interpersonal well-being and their relationship with government. Read the summary report here.

“A key finding of the 2018 CLS is that Myanmar’s cities are blessed with people committed to improving their communities and the city around them,” said Matthew Arnold, The Asia Foundation’s country representative in Myanmar. “During this period of political, economic, and social transition, our hope is that the 2018 CLS provides reliable information about economic development, but also explores other important elements of well-being such as health, relationships, and political agency, so that policymakers can shape urban governance and make cities better places to live and work.”

The 2018 CLS project is a partnership with the Yangon School of Political Science. The new survey builds upon The Asia Foundation’s experience conducting over 300 perception surveys in Asia, the Foundation’s 2017 CLS Pilot Initiative in Myanmar, and in-depth work with municipal authorities to support learning between Myanmar’s cities. For this reason, cities can be thought of as ‘idea laboratories’ – spectacular successes that can be learned from, as detailed throughout the new report.

The findings reveal insights that are consistent across all five cities surveyed:

1. Urban residents see infrastructure improvements moving their city in the right direction but they worry about safety and security. In all five cities, respondents are more likely to say things in their city are headed in the right direction than in the wrong direction. Improvements to road conditions and electricity supply are driving optimism among urban residents. Safety and security concerns are the overwhelming reason why some urban residents do not see their city going in the right direction.
2. Respondents inhabit close-knit, socially engaged communities, and enjoy strong personal relationships. Respondents tend to feel welcome in their neighborhoods and show high levels of satisfaction with personal relationships. Trust levels are relatively high and social engagement, including volunteering and donating, are
some of the highest in the world.
3. People feel mostly powerless to influence government decisions that affect their lives. Most do not feel safe to express political opinions publicly; just 28% say that their state/region representative represents their interests; and nearly 70% say that they are unable to have any influence at all over decisions made by their
municipal authority.
4. Economic uncertainty is widespread (although it differs by income group). Fewer than 40% of respondents expect their financial situation to improve in the next five years and more than a third say that they are unable to afford an unexpected medical bill of MMK 200,000 (approx. USD 130). Wealth inequality is also perceived to be a problem, with nearly two-thirds of respondents saying so, but most are optimistic that hard work can result in improvements in their lives.
5. Self-reported personal well-being is high. Most people have high levels of life satisfaction, happiness and health, and most feel that their life is worthwhile. An incredible 27% of people report being completely happy (10 out of 10).

The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our work across the region addresses five overarching goals—strengthen governance, empower women, expand economic opportunity, increase environmental resilience, and promote regional cooperation.

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The Asia Foundation Selects 2019 Development Fellows

San Francisco, February 20, 2019 — The Asia Foundation today announced the 2019 class of Asia Foundation Development Fellows: Emerging Leadership for Asia’s Future following a highly competitive selection process. Representing 12 Asian countries and a wide range of disciplines, the 2019 Development Fellows—6 women and 6 men—are emerging leaders in their fields, bringing bold, innovative thinking and a deep commitment to addressing Asia’s most complex issues. The 12 fellows selected for the 2019 class are from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Korea, Laos, Mongolia, Myanmar, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam.

The Development Fellows program is at the heart of The Asia Foundation’s mission, bringing exceptional individuals into a powerful network of emerging leaders working to improve lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Now in its 6th year, the program includes 70 current and alumni Fellows across Asia, forming an active and inspirational network of the region’s most promising leaders.

Across the region, a new generation of young leaders are creating positive impact, drawing from their experiences locally and globally. The 2019 Development Fellows, in particular, are an accomplished group of emerging leaders from diverse cultures, country contexts, and work environments, including government, civil society, philanthropy, social enterprise, and the media.

Meet the 2019 Development Fellows:

Stacey Choe (Singapore) is director at the Asia Philanthropy Circle and passionate about leveraging networks and expertise to maximize change and impact in marginalized communities.

Muhammad Darraz (Indonesia) is executive director at the MAARIF Institute for Culture and Humanity, where he focuses on countering violent extremism and peace-building through inter-faith dialogue and collaboration.

Kihyon Kim (South Korea) manages economic development projects at the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) and passionate about incorporating behavioral insights into development projects.

Thuy Anh Nguyen (Vietnam) is a division head at Vietnam’s Ministry of Industry and Trade working on legal frameworks for digital economies to make businesses more innovative, efficient, and agile.

Sanva Saephan (Laos) is an author, social entrepreneur, and UNDP consultant with a firm belief in the power of education.

Sohara Mehroze Shachi (Bangladesh) works on climate finance UNDP and was the first Bangladeshi to win the Asian Young Environmental Journalist of the Year award.

Akshat Singhal (India) is co-founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement, an ecosystem of social initiatives building leadership for a better world and a Global Shaper selected by the World Economic Forum.

Htin Thu (Myanmar) is a doctor and public health specialist at Save the Children International, leading the Global Fund’s largest multilateral health fund tackling atemisinin-resistant malaria.

Aldarsaikhan Tuvshinbat (Mongolia) is an urban planner and the co-creator of Felt City podcast, a platform that contributes thoughtful discussions to the public dialogues on urbanization in Mongolia.

Farhad Wajdi (Afghanistan) is the founder of Ebtakar Inspiring Entrepreneurs of Afghanistan, an NGO empowering unemployed youth and underprivileged women to pursue social enterprises.

Chaturangi Wickramaratne (Sri Lanka) is an environmental scientist at the Environmental Foundation committed to the conservation of Sri Lanka’s natural environment through scientific and legal means.

Boya Yang (China) is an education advocate and a Forbes China’s 30 under 30 most influential young industry leaders.

The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our work across the region addresses five overarching goals—strengthen governance, empower women, expand economic opportunity, increase environmental resilience, and promote regional cooperation.

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The Boeing Company and The Asia Foundation in Vietnam Launch Project to Prepare Young Adults for Careers in IT

Hanoi, February 19, 2019 — The Boeing Company and The Asia Foundation announce a one-year vocational training program in Hanoi and Hai Duong to provide a holistic training program focused on practical information technology skills development for disadvantaged young adults in Hanoi and Hai Duong provinces. The Asia Foundation has been working to support youth in Vietnam, particularly those from rural areas with limited work options and vulnerable to exploitation, with practical vocational training programs that provide skills advancement, career advice, and job placement services.

In partnership with The Boeing Company, the program aims to benefit up to 100 disadvantaged youth between the ages of 18-30, whose access to formal or mainstream vocational training is denied due to barriers such as poverty, lack of education, and difficult family circumstances. The disadvantaged young adults targeted by this project are some of those most vulnerable and with the greatest need: homeless and migrant youth, school dropouts, unemployed secondary school graduates, youth with disabilities, those from ethnic minority backgrounds, and victims of social issues such as domestic violence and human trafficking. The project’s long-term goal is to help break down the aforementioned barriers faced by disadvantaged, unemployed youth by providing them with in-demand skills that are in short supply in Vietnam. Ultimately, the project will provide the participating youth with much better opportunities to obtain and sustain decent and secure employment in high-demand sectors.

As part of the program, youth will undergo both technical skills training focused on graphic design, 3D-modeling, and web development or coding in addition to practical instruction in English language, financial literacy, work readiness, and on-the-job training. Upon completion of the program, youth will receive six months of follow-up guidance to help them secure permanent employment.

“Vietnam’s youth account for a significant proportion of the country’s labor force,” said Skip Boyce, president, Boeing Southeast Asia. “As a nation aiming to progress to a higher value economy, it is imperative that these young adults in Vietnam are sufficiently skilled to meet a changing labor market. Boeing’s partnership with The Asia Foundation will support Vietnam’s broader economic goals by equipping its core labor with skillsets for a career in high-growth sectors.”

Of the 1.4 million people who enter the labor market each year, only 27% of workers have received training relevant to their jobs, and only 15% have completed vocational training in a formal capacity. In light of the country context and community needs, the Government of Vietnam has put vocational skills training and boosting employment at the core of its development goals. By 2020, the government aims for trained, skilled workers to make up 55% of the labor force. Vietnam will need more viable opportunities for practical skills training to fill this ambitious goal and rising demand.

“Vietnam needs to increase the technical skills of all workers, advancing the workforce’s position in the labor value chain and keeping up with a transitioning economy. We are grateful to Boeing for joining us in this effort,” said Michael DiGregorio, The Asia Foundation’s country representative in Vietnam.

As Vietnam strives to reach its goal of achieving middle income status by 2035, The Asia Foundation works to promote and support the quality and inclusiveness of the nation’s economic growth.

The Boeing Company and The Asia Foundation will implement this program in partnership with REACH, a local non-governmental organization specializing in providing vocational training, career advice, and job placement to some of Vietnam’s most disadvantaged youth. Funding for the project is supported by The Boeing Company.

About The Boeing Company
Chicago-based Boeing is the world’s largest aerospace company and leading manufacturer of commercial jetliners and defense, space and security systems. A top U.S. exporter, the company supports airlines and U.S. and allied government customers in 150 countries.

About REACH
Established in 2008, REACH is a local nonprofit organization that specializes in providing vocational training, career advice and job placement for Vietnam’s most disadvantaged youth. REACH provides practical training in areas including hospitality, tourism, hairdressing, nail art, sales, marketing, and web and graphic design across its centers in Hanoi, Da Nang, Hue, Hoi An, and Hai Duong. To date, REACH has trained over 12,000 youth with a very committed staff. Over 80% of its students have been placed in a stable employment post-graduation in the services sector such as bartending, sales, and web design.

About The Asia Foundation
The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our work across the region addresses five overarching goals—strengthen governance, empower women, expand economic opportunity, increase environmental resilience, and promote regional cooperation.

Read more about the Foundation’s work.

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Asia Foundation Supports New Book on the Philippines’ Electoral System

Quezon City, Philippines, February 13, 2019 — The Asia Foundation supported the launch of a new book that examines problems in the Philippines’ prevailing electoral system and presents new options for converting votes to seats in Strong Patronage, Weak Parties: The Case for Electoral System Redesign in the Philippines.

Launched together with Anvil Publishing and The Australian National University, the book describes the country’s prevailing electoral system as one that perpetuates weak and disjointed political parties. It is a system that sets up conditions for ‘candidate-centric’ instead of ‘party-centric’ governance. Experiences from other countries highlighted in the book suggest that party-centric systems encourage more attention to platforms and promote greater consideration of the nation’s long-term development interests. Party-centric systems can also have a positive impact on democracy, particularly for the poor and marginalized—who have the most to gain from stronger issue-oriented political parties.

“There is enormous potential in a well-designed electoral system, as it can help to foster positive change in the way politics is done,” says Paul Hutchcroft, a scholar of comparative and Southeast Asian politics, professor at The Australian National University, and editor of the book. “Electoral system redesign can encourage a greater focus on policies and programs, and less orientation to patronage and pork.”

At the book launch, Commissioner Luie Tito Guia from the Commission on Elections said the book “effectively makes a case for revisiting the rules that govern how politics and elections are practiced in the Philippines.”

Two contributors to the book include Socorro Reyes of the Center for Legislative Development, and Ramon Casiple, executive director of the Institute for Political and Electoral Reform.

The authors propose a range of options, including reforms to the party-list system and the Senate and local legislative councils. A recurring theme is the virtue of ‘closed-list proportional representation’ a system in which parties choose and rank candidates on their party list to strengthen party cohesion. To promote gender equality, this electoral arrangement could be combined with a ‘zipper system’, where women and men alternate on the party’s list of multiple candidates.

“It is fantastic to be part of the discussion in the Philippines in which democracy is such an ingrained part of the nation’s identity, being the first democracy in Asia,” says Sam Chittick, The Asia Foundation’s country representative in the Philippines. While the Foundation does not endorse any of the book’s recommendations specifically, Chittick says it will continue to “play a small part in promoting the discussions and helping raise constructive ideas towards embracing democracy and a better electoral process.”

Strong Patronage, Weak Parties will be available in local bookstores in the Philippines and online at Anvil Publishing. A brief highlighting the volume’s salient points is available here.

The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our work across the region addresses five overarching goals—strengthen governance, empower women, expand economic opportunity, increase environmental resilience, and promote regional cooperation.

Read more about the Foundation’s work.

For media inquiries, please visit our News Room. Engage with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.

The Asia Foundation Hosts Roundtable on “Ensuring Justice Delivery for Survivors of Gender-Based Violence and Trafficking”

New Delhi, February 12, 2019 — On January 23, 2019, The Asia Foundation office hosted a roundtable on “Ensuring Justice Delivery for Survivors of Gender-Based Violence and Trafficking” at the International Habitat Centre in New Delhi. The Asia Foundation’s India office convened members of Indian civil society, law practitioners, trafficking and gender experts, as well as representatives from the United Nation’s Office on Drugs and Crime and the United States Embassy in New Delhi. Participants shared their thoughts and experiences on improving justice delivery for survivors of gender-based violence and human trafficking and identified ways to gain a better understanding of how these groups access basic services and justice. The discussion was moderated by Nandita Baruah, The Asia Foundation’s country representative in India.

The following key issues were discussed:

  • The urgent need to demystify and improve the implementation of existing laws, and closely examine how well service providers are being able to address the needs of both trafficking and gender-based violence survivors.
  • New areas in which to focus attention including; cyber space, an emerging site of vulnerability for marginalized groups; developing new redressal mechanisms for changing forms of abuse against women; access to services and specialized counseling for LGBTQI communities; and a law or system for addressing the needs of refugees.
  • Pushing for participatory justice, where the survivor has a voice and decision-making authority, as a part of creating an ecosystem that is focused on survivors’ immediate and future needs.
  • Identifying programs where the state and civil society organizations have collaborated successfully to help build more successful programs that include government service providers.

The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our work across the region addresses five overarching goals—strengthen governance, empower women, expand economic opportunity, increase environmental resilience, and promote regional cooperation.

Read more about the Foundation’s work.

For media inquiries, please visit our News Room. Engage with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.

The Asia Foundation and Ateneo School of Government Host US-Philippines Bilateral Relationship Conference

February 8, 2019 — Scholars and policymakers across the region came together to this week to explore the longstanding partnership between the United States and the Philippines and future areas of cooperation. The February 7-8 conference, “The Future of the U.S.–Philippines Bilateral Relationship” was organized by The Asia Foundation and Ateneo School of Government, and supported by the U.S. government. U.S. Ambassador Sung Y. Kim opened the conference alongside Department of Foreign Affairs Undersecretary Enrique Manolo and Department of Defense Undersecretary Cardoza Luna. The Asia Foundation’s Philippines Country Representative Sam Chittick and Senior Director of International Relations Programs John Brandon were featured speakers at the conference.

The bilateral relationship has long been a stable and resilient partnership, and it continues to grow. In 2016, the United States was the Philippines’ largest trading partner, second-biggest market for the Philippines’ exports, and third largest investor into the Philippines.

The two-day dialogue addressed the future of the U.S.-Philippines military alliance, maritime and border security, countering violent extremism, and broader regional challenges. Sessions examined other issues related to economic engagement, trade, competitiveness, and the close cultural and intergenerational ties that bind the two countries.

“Throughout our shared history, we have together confronted and overcome numerous challenges. Our nations are strongest when we work together as friends, partners, and allies,” said U.S. Ambassador Kim as he opened the conference at the Manila Peninsula in Makati City. “However, as we face new domestic, regional, and global challenges, we cannot rest simply on our confidence in the strength of this longstanding relationship. We need to examine and analyze what lies over the horizon to ensure that we bring to bear the most effective tools and resources to not just overcome those challenges, but to seize opportunities.”

The first session, featuring former U.S. Ambassador Thomas Hubbard, examined the Future of the U.S.-Philippine Military Alliance. This panel examined the Mutual Defense Treaty, evolution of the alliance to counter new threats, and how the U.S. and Philippine armed forces can enhance cooperation to handle future challenges.

It was followed by a session on Countering Violent Extremism, which focused on the social, developmental, and ideological factors contributing to violent extremism in the Philippines, especially the role of women not only as peacemakers and mothers, but also as leaders, teachers, fighters, and influencers.

The third session, Responding to Regional Challenges in Asia, looked broadly at regional challenges, including China’s rise and shifting strategic relationships, the connection between human rights advocacy and foreign policy, as well as how domestic political situations impact regional issues.

The final session examining security was on Maritime and Border Security. This session took a deep dive into issues around UNCLOS and international law, the ongoing dispute in the West Philippine/South China Sea, and ongoing militarization of artificial islands in international waters.

The second day of the conference focused on economic engagement. During the panel, Investing in the Future and Pushing through Middle Income Status: Areas of Cooperation, speakers analyzed the role of infrastructure in economic development, how the United States might best support the Philippines’ continued upward economic advancement, and the role of development assistance in the relationship, as the economy of the Philippines continues to grow.

The Trade, Business, and Investment session focused on a potential free trade agreement, its prospects for passage, and what this might mean for the two countries. This was contrasted to the Trans-Pacific Partnership and other potential agreements, and how ASEAN might play a role.

The importance of technological advancement and innovation was outlined in Technology and Industry: Perspectives and Areas of U.S.-Philippines Growth. The panel examined technology’s role in propelling development and creating jobs in the Philippines, cultivating a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, and how Silicon Valley and other tech hubs in the U.S. can share lessons.

Concluding the conference with a look to the future, Emerging Leaders in U.S.-Philippines Relations, was live streamed with university students, and tapped into a youthful perspective on the bilateral relationship and opportunities for the next generation to write the next chapters in our shared history.

Click here for more information on the conference.

The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our work across the region addresses five overarching goals—strengthen governance, empower women, expand economic opportunity, increase environmental resilience, and promote regional cooperation.

Read more about the Foundation’s work.

For media inquiries, please visit our  News Room. Engage with us on  Facebook, Twitter,  LinkedIn, and Instagram.

Announcing the Participants of the 2019 YSEALI Workshop on Eco & Sustainable Tourism

February 6, 2019 — The Asia Foundation is pleased to announce the participants of the 2019 Young Southeast Asian Leadership Initiative (YSEALI) Workshop on Eco & Sustainable Tourism, a program of the U.S. Department of State. The week-long workshop will take place March 4-8, 2019 in Luang Prabang, Laos, bringing together 50 participants from ASEAN countries and Timor-Leste to learn best practices from industry experts and develop a regional network of peers.

Participants

Brunei
Aminah Faizah Kaharuddin
Wei Lee Chin

Cambodia
Bunly Say
Puthea Chea
Sarin Roeun
Sokhorng Kry

Indonesia
I Gede Adi Septiawan Koriawan
Mutiah Mutiah
Putu Pitanatri
Toni Sitania
Yoana Kristiawati
Yun Pratiwi

Laos
Alisa Luangrath
Bounsouvanh Leesiaye
Maxly Inthaxai
Miss Phengphanh Southivong
Nalinh Inlatsamy
Phouthasone Khouangvichit
Souliphone Dalavong
Souvit Chuekonhya
Thiladeth Sivixay
Xaiykhamla Maliya

Malaysia
Lai Cheng Wong
Rhonwyn Hagedorn
Samantha Liza Durit
Nakevi Palaniappan

Myanmar
Arkar Htun
Cing Deih Kim
Ei Su
Khaing Phoo

Philippines
Bryan Tomas McClelland
Clareziel Ladringan
Clark Ross Bautista
Kimberly Jane Lim
Rafael Ignacio Dionisio

Singapore
Ang Hong Chua
Remus Tan

Thailand
Manita Vivatsethachai
Napas Somsawad
Sarocha Sunthornthip
Thanakrit Thongfa

Timor-Leste
Emmanuel Correia Maia
Elisangela Ferreira
Kerry Galhos
Shella Smith da Cunha

Vietnam
Hai Ly Thi
Huong Thi Vu
Ngan Thi Thuy Nguyen
Thanh Thanh Thi Nguyen
Yen Thi Hai Le

About the Workshop

Launched in 2013, YSEALI is the U.S. Department of State’s signature program to strengthen leadership development and networking in Southeast Asia. Through a variety of programs and engagements, YSEALI seeks to build the leadership capabilities of youth in the region, strengthen ties between the United States and Southeast Asia, and nurture an ASEAN community of leaders who work across borders to solve common issues.

The 2019 YSEALI Workshop on Eco & Sustainable Tourism will showcase innovative approaches to sustainable tourism and socially-responsible business practices through field visits to successful small and medium ecotourism enterprises, and allow young innovators and entrepreneurs from across ASEAN and Timor-Leste to connect with each other and with participating experts. Throughout the workshop, participants will showcase projects, receive mentorship, explore opportunities to expand their work, exchange ideas on how to foster sustainable and socially-responsible tourism initiatives in their communities, and find avenues for building sustained economic development in their communities. The workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of State and implemented by The Asia Foundation.

The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our work across the region addresses five overarching goals—strengthen governance, empower women, expand economic opportunity, increase environmental resilience, and promote regional cooperation.

Read more about the Foundation’s work.

For media inquiries, please visit our News Room. Engage with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.